Archive | Uncategorized RSS feed for this section

Ancient Egyptian Clay Cartouches

16 Jan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In celebration of Room 14’s unit on Ancient Egypt, we decided to make personal cartouches from clay.  In ancient Egyptian times, a cartouche was a “name plate” that was inscribed with hieroglyphs.  Using a hieroglyph translator chart, the students decoded their names and inscribed the symbols on a clay oval slab, creating a cartouche.

Lesson Overview:

I started out by explaining the lesson while the kids sat on the floor.  We talked about cartouches and I did a sample hieroglyph translation on the whiteboard with my name.  I explained that the first step was to accurately translate their name on to a piece of paper.  Then I demonstrated to them how to wedge the clay to remove the air bubbles and how to roll it out into a slab (about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick) .  I then used a  cartouche template I had cut out  from tag board to trace the shape on to the clay.  (I cut out several of these for students to use)  Or,  I explained they could cut out their own cartouche oval without the template.  Then I explained that they would take their pieces back to their desks to work on the hieroglyph inscriptions and design.

Step 1:  We had the students practice their hyroglyphic names on a piece of paper.  Hyroglyphic charts can be found on the internet. Here is an example:  http://www.uhsda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/hieroglyphics-table.jpg  Once they had successfully completed the translation, we set them to work on the clay.

Step 2:  I set out two old cloth shower curtains for the students to wedge and roll the clay on.  If you roll the clay on a desk it just ends up sticking!  (Think bread dough!)  Once they had their cartouche shape slab, they carefully carried it back to their desks and set it on a piece of paper to prevent it from sticking.  I used construction paper so that it would be strong enough to support the clay during the drying process.

Step 3:  Using their hyroglyphics paper rough draft, the students inscribe the design on to the clay using a thin pointy tool (toothpick, pencil,  clay tools)

Step 4:  I stored the cartouches on the shelf in the kiln room to dry for about a week and then bisque fired them in the kiln.

Step 5:  After firing, I brought the pieces back for the students to glaze.  They choose a lighter glaze for the background and a darker one for the hieroglyphs details.

Step 6:  Glaze fired the pieces and returned to the students (finally!)

Comments:  A ceramics project is a commitment of time on the docent’s part (and the student) but it is well worth it.  The students love working with clay and its great to give them the exposure to this medium.  Ceramics projects do break – part of the deal – but they can be glued with superglue after the bisque/glaze firings.  I highly recommend trying one ceramics project a year!

Art Elements covered: Form, Shape, texture, line, color

Art Docent: Kimberly Albert

Room 14 – Gaffney, 3rd grade

albertclan@aol.com

Advertisements

Mondrian

16 Jan

Room 4 Lesson on Mondrian – December, 2012

broadway boogie mondrian Room 4

Docent: Matt Schonwald-MBA
mattschonwald@gmail.com

Mondrian Shapes and Colors

16 Jan

Room 2 – Using Shapes and Colors in the style of Mondrian

DSCN8442 DSCN8444

Preparation: We pre-cut yellow, red and blue rectangles of various sizes, and 1 x 18 or 12 inch strips of black. The project was done on 12 x 18 white paper.

Lesson: We looked at Mondrian’s self-portrait and a photo of him when he was much older. We looked at an early representational painting, a painting from his cubism phase, and a geometic, basic colored abstract and explained how he believed in using only the basic essences of things in his work. Art, then, does not need to look like a real thing. Cathy showed a nature photograph, then how she made an abstract from it using the elements of blue sky, yellow sun, flower stems and red flowers.

We distributed the white paper and sets of the black strips and colored rectangles. We asked the students to start by gluing some black strips on the horizontal and vertical of the picture, then glue or cut and glue a few colored rectangles to complete the picture. When they gave their pictures to Ms. Beckley she asked them what was in their picture.
Lesson Title: Using Shapes and Colors in the style of Mondrian
Room#, Grade, Teacher: Rm 2, Kindergarten, Ms Beckley
Docent/s: Eileen Berlin and Cathy Clark

November, 2012 lesson

Email: catherinejclark@comcast.net
Art Elements/Principles/Artists Reviewed: lines and rectangles, basic colors

Book Art

6 Nov

B4 BOOK ART

INSPIRED BY RYAN COLEMAN http://ryancolemanart.com/exhibitionphotos/

AND

this BOOK ART video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItBDO3OylM0&feature=related

In this lesson we talked about BOOK ART and looked at some examples by artist RYAN COLEMAN. We used cotton balls instead of paint brushes for our background. We used an old book found at the Thrift store. We focused on Line and Space.

Art Docent: Debi Boyette
Lesson Title: Book Art
Room#, Grade, Teacher: B4, Mrs. Vaagsland
Art Elements/Principles/Artists Reviewed: LINE and SPACE

Warm and Cool Colors

26 Oct

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This lesson was about warm colors and cool colors. Identifying them. Creating a pattern with them. Looking at artists that use both warm and cool colors in the same painting (Klee, Kandinsky, Jacob Lawrence). And what effect that has on the painting. We talked about primary colors and a simple addition problem (1 + 1= 2). One primary color + one primary color = a secondary color.

We used watercolor pencils for this lesson. Color with pencil…apply water… and presto! It becomes like watercolors! The kids liked watching the transformation.

Here’s the lesson:

Review color theory and the color wheel. Talk about primary and secondary colors. Discuss complimentary colors or color opposites and how those combinations are always the result of a pairing of one primary color with a secondary color.

Complimentary colors are made up of a warm color and a cool color and how they sit across from each other on the color wheel.

Red (a warm primary color) is the compliment (opposite) of Green (a cool secondary color)
Blue (a cool primary color) is the compliment (opposite) of Orange (a warm secondary color)
Yellow (a warm primary color) is the compliment (opposite) of Purple (a cool secondary color)

A primary color + a primary color equals a secondary color.  1+1=2

Directions:

Fold cardstock in half one direction and then in half again in the other direction so that you end up with four boxes.

Draw diagonal lines in one box, starting in the middle and radiating outward. Lines should not be any closer than a finger width apart.

Repeat on the remaining three boxes so that all the lines would match up at the folds.

Add colors in an alternating pattern of warm and cool. Starting with the center box (4 triangles). Make sure each triangle alternates warm/cool.

Color is added in such a way as that the warm cool pattern continues both from the center to the sides of each color.

Once all the color was added we use Q-tips to add water and blend.

Art Docents:

Marcie Guthrie and Gala Bent
2nd grade, Room B3, Ms. Schroder
Art Elements/Principles/Artists Reviewed: color