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Sunsets and Silhouettes

20 Jan

cclark

Preparation: We pre-cut rectangles of black paper in 3 sizes – the width of the painting t and two smaller sizes. The painting were done on white paper using watercolors in sunset shades – blue, white, red, orange, magenta, yellow.

Lesson:

We talked about the life of “cowboy artist” C.M. Russell and his love of the American West. We showed photographs of sunsets and example paintings Eileen and her granddaughter had done, containing elements like mountains, trees, cactus silhouettes.

We distributed paper, 1″ wide brushes, paints and water. The students painted the sky at sunset, using long horizontal brushstrokes allowing colors to mix at the margins. While the paints were drying they cut out black shapes for their background and foreground elements, then glued the silhouettes onto their paintings.

Unrelated activity pages were used by the students to allow time for the watercolors to dry.

Room/Grade/Teacher: Rm 2, Kindergarten, Ms Beckley

Art Docents: Eileen Berlin, Cathy Clark, Harriet Eidelman

Art Elements/Artist: Watercolors/C.M. Russell

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Ancient Egyptian Clay Cartouches

16 Jan

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In celebration of Room 14’s unit on Ancient Egypt, we decided to make personal cartouches from clay.  In ancient Egyptian times, a cartouche was a “name plate” that was inscribed with hieroglyphs.  Using a hieroglyph translator chart, the students decoded their names and inscribed the symbols on a clay oval slab, creating a cartouche.

Lesson Overview:

I started out by explaining the lesson while the kids sat on the floor.  We talked about cartouches and I did a sample hieroglyph translation on the whiteboard with my name.  I explained that the first step was to accurately translate their name on to a piece of paper.  Then I demonstrated to them how to wedge the clay to remove the air bubbles and how to roll it out into a slab (about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick) .  I then used a  cartouche template I had cut out  from tag board to trace the shape on to the clay.  (I cut out several of these for students to use)  Or,  I explained they could cut out their own cartouche oval without the template.  Then I explained that they would take their pieces back to their desks to work on the hieroglyph inscriptions and design.

Step 1:  We had the students practice their hyroglyphic names on a piece of paper.  Hyroglyphic charts can be found on the internet. Here is an example:  http://www.uhsda.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/hieroglyphics-table.jpg  Once they had successfully completed the translation, we set them to work on the clay.

Step 2:  I set out two old cloth shower curtains for the students to wedge and roll the clay on.  If you roll the clay on a desk it just ends up sticking!  (Think bread dough!)  Once they had their cartouche shape slab, they carefully carried it back to their desks and set it on a piece of paper to prevent it from sticking.  I used construction paper so that it would be strong enough to support the clay during the drying process.

Step 3:  Using their hyroglyphics paper rough draft, the students inscribe the design on to the clay using a thin pointy tool (toothpick, pencil,  clay tools)

Step 4:  I stored the cartouches on the shelf in the kiln room to dry for about a week and then bisque fired them in the kiln.

Step 5:  After firing, I brought the pieces back for the students to glaze.  They choose a lighter glaze for the background and a darker one for the hieroglyphs details.

Step 6:  Glaze fired the pieces and returned to the students (finally!)

Comments:  A ceramics project is a commitment of time on the docent’s part (and the student) but it is well worth it.  The students love working with clay and its great to give them the exposure to this medium.  Ceramics projects do break – part of the deal – but they can be glued with superglue after the bisque/glaze firings.  I highly recommend trying one ceramics project a year!

Art Elements covered: Form, Shape, texture, line, color

Art Docent: Kimberly Albert

Room 14 – Gaffney, 3rd grade

albertclan@aol.com

Mondrian

16 Jan

Room 4 Lesson on Mondrian – December, 2012

broadway boogie mondrian Room 4

Docent: Matt Schonwald-MBA
mattschonwald@gmail.com

Mondrian Shapes and Colors

16 Jan

Room 2 – Using Shapes and Colors in the style of Mondrian

DSCN8442 DSCN8444

Preparation: We pre-cut yellow, red and blue rectangles of various sizes, and 1 x 18 or 12 inch strips of black. The project was done on 12 x 18 white paper.

Lesson: We looked at Mondrian’s self-portrait and a photo of him when he was much older. We looked at an early representational painting, a painting from his cubism phase, and a geometic, basic colored abstract and explained how he believed in using only the basic essences of things in his work. Art, then, does not need to look like a real thing. Cathy showed a nature photograph, then how she made an abstract from it using the elements of blue sky, yellow sun, flower stems and red flowers.

We distributed the white paper and sets of the black strips and colored rectangles. We asked the students to start by gluing some black strips on the horizontal and vertical of the picture, then glue or cut and glue a few colored rectangles to complete the picture. When they gave their pictures to Ms. Beckley she asked them what was in their picture.
Lesson Title: Using Shapes and Colors in the style of Mondrian
Room#, Grade, Teacher: Rm 2, Kindergarten, Ms Beckley
Docent/s: Eileen Berlin and Cathy Clark

November, 2012 lesson

Email: catherinejclark@comcast.net
Art Elements/Principles/Artists Reviewed: lines and rectangles, basic colors

Van Gogh “Starry Night” style paintings

11 Dec

Rm2photo

 

Rm 2, Kindergarten, Ms Beckley December 11 art lesson

Art docents: Eileen Berlin and Cathy Clark

 

Title: Starry Night in the style of Vincent Van Gogh

 

Art Element: lines and curves

 

Preparation: We pre-cut sets of small rectangles of various colors and sizes for each table, and prepared a tray or baking tin of 6 fingerpaints for each pair of students. We used white, yellow, orange, red, green and brown washable tempura thinned with a little dish detergent. The project was done on 12 x 18 blue paper.

 

Lesson: We looked at Vincent Van Gogh’s self-portrait and Eileen talked a little about his life. Van Gogh tried many different jobs before he concentrated on painting. Sometimes he became so focused on painting that he forgot to eat or sleep. We looked at one of his most famous works, Starry Night, and pointed out the main elements in the painting — houses, tree, night sky. We talked about how Van Gogh tried to express emotions and motion in this painting.

 

We distributed the blue paper and sets of small rectangles. Eileen used the document viewer as she modeled and explained each step in the project.

 

1) Fold a rectangle and cut at a slant to create a house with a roof. Glue 2 or 3 houses on the lower right of the picture. (When the children were well into this, we covered their fronts with plastic wrap and distributed the trays of fingerpaints.)

 

2) Use small dabs of paint to create lighted windows in some of the houses. Use longer straight or curved lines or swirls to draw a tree on the left side of the picture.

 

3) Add stars and the moon to the night sky. Create the impression of glow by surrounding the stars with short lines. Some created the impression of wind using large, long swirls of color.

 

Closing Comments: Many steps for a single lesson. Many, many wet wipes used.

 

 

The “Dot” and International Dot Day!

26 Nov

In September, Room 14 (Gaffney-3rd grd) students participated in International Dot Day.  This is a day to celebrate creativity and personal expression inspired by the well known book, “The Dot”.

The Learning Objectives of the lesson were to:

1.  Learn to explore their creativity and express themselves

2.  Have a chance to make their mark without worrying about getting it right.

3.  Develop a sense of pride in their abilities and enjoy a feeling of ownership over their creations.

We started the lesson by reading “the Dot”, by Peter Reynolds.  This is a story about a little girl who is unsure about her drawing abilities, and her teacher who encourages her to make her mark (a dot), and see where it takes her, building her confidence as an artist.

Then, Room 14 set to work on their own dots, using watercolor to create their masterpieces.  Each one of them really made their mark as no two were alike!

Lesson Materials:

Book:  The Dot, by Peter Reynolds

paper

brushes

watercolors

Resources:  This website has everything you will need for your International Dot Day Lesson

http://fablevisionlearning.com/dotday/

Docent:  Kimberly Albert

kimberlyalbert12@gmail.com

Book Art

6 Nov

B4 BOOK ART

INSPIRED BY RYAN COLEMAN http://ryancolemanart.com/exhibitionphotos/

AND

this BOOK ART video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItBDO3OylM0&feature=related

In this lesson we talked about BOOK ART and looked at some examples by artist RYAN COLEMAN. We used cotton balls instead of paint brushes for our background. We used an old book found at the Thrift store. We focused on Line and Space.

Art Docent: Debi Boyette
Lesson Title: Book Art
Room#, Grade, Teacher: B4, Mrs. Vaagsland
Art Elements/Principles/Artists Reviewed: LINE and SPACE